Stories tagged with this NRM Topic

Cape York NRM delivered sustainable grazing management and on-ground works: maintaining Cape York’s resource base for sustainable management and use – reducing pests and weeds, improving water quality in 2013-2016.  The project was funded by the Queensland Government’s Queensland Natural Resource

Case Study of Fire Management and related costs for Elsey Station (1999).

Tree hollows are naturally-occurring holes in living or dead trees. Hollows form in many species but are most abundant in eucalypts. Termite activity, storms and fire contribute to both the formation and destruction of tree hollows.
Whilst many activities require vegetation clearing, the habitat of a threatened species should never be cleared. Threatened species living in a small area are particularly vulnerable to vegetation clearing, which may destroy their entire habitat.

Cattle graziers would like to think that if they look after their pastures and keep weeds and pest animals under control, the rest of the environment can look after itself.

Lewis Roberts is a highly regarded self-taught naturalist and botanical illustrator. He has an Order of Australia, and last year quietly received the Queensland Natural History award.

Stories from the people who live, breathe and work Cape York Peninsula, managing the land and our future.

First episode available Friday 10 February 2017.

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Polly wanna peanut?

The peanut growers of Lakeland in Cape York have found an innovative way to stop Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos ( Calyptorhynchus banksii ) from eating their peanut crops - they grow a field of peanuts specifically for the cockatoos.