Stories in this Theme

Introduction

Wild Horses are found through most of the Northern Territory, but are particularly abundant in the Gulf region, parts of western Arnhem Land, the Victoria River District, and the West MacDonnell Ranges.

Introduction

Cats arrived in Australia with European settlers, and quickly became established through the continent. They are common and widespread throughout the Northern Territory, with the only exceptions being a few off-shore Islands. Not needing to drink, they even survive in deserts, where they prefer dense cover.

Introduction

Seagrasses are marine flowering plants that have adapted to growing in muddy, near-shore environments. They form meadows wherever the ocean is shallow enough to allow the sunlight to reach the sea floor. Seagrass meadows are found in river estuaries, along the coast and, if the water is clear enough, way out to sea in waters up to 60 m deep. Recent mapping of the seagrass distribution along the eastern half of the Northern Territory coastline found over 70,000 hectares of intertidal and shallow sub-tidal seagrass beds.

Introduction

There is perhaps no animal in Australia that arouses such mixed emotions as does the Dingo. A relatively recent arrival to the country, Dingoes, along with Wild Dogs, can inflict much damage on livestock. Dingoes mainly feed on native mammals, and are likely to have driven some native species to extinction soon after they were brought to northern Australia from eastern Asia around 5,000 years ago.

What it looks like: The Speartooth Shark, also known as Bizant River Shark, is grey in colour, paler below than above. It can grow to around 3 m in length. It has a pale, just visible, stripe across its flanks, a short, broadly rounded snout and small eyes. Unlike in the Northern River Shark, which has uniformly grey skin around its eyes, the eyes of the Speartooth Shark are located at the point of colour change.

What it looks like: The Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin is a small a grey to very light grey dolphin that can grow up to 3 m long. It has a long beak and a small triangular fin on its back, which can have distinctive pink pigmentation. Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins are slow swimmers, usually found in small schools, often in the same areas as the Australian Snubfin or Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphins.