Stories in this Theme

The plant and animal species on Cape York Peninsula can show whether the country is healthy for wildlife and being managed sustainably. We place particular value on some of these species because they are rare or threatened in Queensland, Australia, or worldwide, or are only found on the peninsula. Others are important because their presence shows that the special needs they share with a wide range of other species are being met. You will find profiles of 21 Healthy Country Indicator Species for Cape York Peninsula in the guide, along with information on where they live, the habitat features they need, why they are important as indicators, and how to manage your country well for them.

As part of a larger project to determine “the production and biodiversity costs and benefits of woodland thickening and mechanical thinning in the Qld Desert Uplands”, data were gathered from four properties around Torrens Creek and Prairie in Flinders Shire, north-west Qld.

More information on the dry season in Cape York Peninsula.

Life is tough for plants living in the seasonally dry tropics. Soils are poor and for half the year the land is parched and prone to fires while for the other half it is inundated with water.Only plants which have been able to adapt to this punishing regime can grow here, having developed certain characteristics to make this possible.

The Cape York Land Use Strategy is an initiative of the Queensland Government to provide a basis for public participation in planninng for the ecologically sustainable development of Cape York Peninsula.

Original copy of a report on Cape York Peninsula,  written in 1959.

Sue Shephard moved to Cape York in 1970 to work at Musgrave Station for the Shephard family.  She met the youngest Shephard son, Tom, got married, and together they raised four children on Artemis Station.

Artemis is a 125 thousand hectare cattle property between Laura and Coen on Cape York Peninsula. Sue tells some amazing stories of raising kids and cattle, caring for country, and researching the endangered golden shouldered parrot.

We begin the second series of My Cape York Life on Artemis Station, a cattle property in the heart of Cape York.  Artemis is a 125 thousand hectare property midway between Coen and Laura. The property has been in the Shephard family for about 100 years and is run by Tom and Sue Shephard. In episode one, we are talking with Tom.

Stories from the people who live, breathe and work Cape York Peninsula, managing the land and our future.

First episode available Friday 16 March 2018.

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The theme music is Cape York by Black Image Band, used with permission from Vince Harrigan, Black Image Band.

This series is hosted by Cape York NRM's Lyndal Scobell, and produced by Richard Dinnen. Cape York NRM's on-line team are Ben Lister and Robyn May.

Lewis Roberts is a highly regarded self-taught naturalist and botanical illustrator. He has an Order of Australia, and last year quietly received the Queensland Natural History award. Scientists from all over the world visit Lewis and his brother Charlie at Shiptons Flat – a property which has been in their family for well over one hundred years. Lewis has had several species named after him, yet is incredibly modest. His kind and gentle nature, and in depth knowledge of his environment, shines through in this interview - on the banks of Parrot Creek at Shiptons Flat.