Stories in this Theme

The plant and animal species on Cape York Peninsula can show whether the country is healthy for wildlife and being managed sustainably. We place particular value on some of these species because they are rare or threatened in Queensland, Australia, or worldwide, or are only found on the peninsula. Others are important because their presence shows that the special needs they share with a wide range of other species are being met. You will find profiles of 21 Healthy Country Indicator Species for Cape York Peninsula in the guide, along with information on where they live, the habitat features they need, why they are important as indicators, and how to manage your country well for them.

As part of a larger project to determine “the production and biodiversity costs and benefits of woodland thickening and mechanical thinning in the Qld Desert Uplands”, data were gathered from four properties around Torrens Creek and Prairie in Flinders Shire, north-west Qld.

More information on the dry season in Cape York Peninsula.

Life is tough for plants living in the seasonally dry tropics. Soils are poor and for half the year the land is parched and prone to fires while for the other half it is inundated with water.Only plants which have been able to adapt to this punishing regime can grow here, having developed certain characteristics to make this possible.

The Cape York Land Use Strategy is an initiative of the Queensland Government to provide a basis for public participation in planninng for the ecologically sustainable development of Cape York Peninsula.

Original copy of a report on Cape York Peninsula,  written in 1959.

This week Cape York NRM bring you two bonus episodes of My Cape York Life.

We are talking with Bob Frazer, who was the founding Chief Executive Officer of Cape York NRM, and spent eight years with the organisation, retiring in April 2018.

Bob has an impressive career, spending 13 years in NRM leadership positions in Cape York and North Queensland, and he is highly regarded across Australia for his work.

Jessie Price is a young mum, an environmental scientist, and the Grazing Engagement Officer with South Cape York Catchments - a community-based natural resource management organisation based in Cooktown.

Jessie began her Cape York working life as a trainee with Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, a spectacular introduction to the region she loves living in and working for.

Alan Wilson has spent almost 40 years on Cape York, and has seen and done a lot. He is a Cook Shire Councillor, and he’s run cattle stations, the Laura pub and the town’s roadhouse.

He has led many campaigns to improve life on the Cape. He pushed for the new bridge over the Laura River south of town, and continues to campaign for one at north Laura – where wet season floods isolate the town and can be a real danger to people.

Waratah Nicholls arrived in Far North Queensland in the early 80's for a Bungle in the Jungle at Bloomfield and fell in love. Her piece of paradise is in Mungumby Valley - a stones throw from the famous Lions Den Hotel.