Stories in this sector

Purpose

Wildfire causes major losses to ground cover, and is a key contributor to erosion of Cape York’s fragile soils, to sedimentation of water ways, and to poorer water quality on Cape York.  It also results in reduced biodiversity and a reduction of suitable grazing country.

By Mapoon Land and Sea Rangers

The latest cullling operation in Mapoon, saw 135 five feral pigs destroyed. Mapoon Land and Sea Rangers and the Animal Management officer conducted an aerial pig cull in early October, a great effort by all involved.

The Land and Sea Management Unit carries out four culls annually, and this effort was the first involving local staff.Huge thanks to Lee Ase, Thomas Pitt and chopper pilot Bungie Scott for their efforts.

Submitted by Charles Darwin University

In November 2014 Western Cape Turtle Threat Alliance Coordinator Johanna Karam and Apudthama Ranger Dale Motlop joined more than 40 people from across northern Australia for a workshop on wildlife monitoring using motion detection cameras, in Darwin.

By James Donaldson

Two recent visits to Dawnvale Station and the Bloomfield River have excited local fish researchers Brendan Ebner (Ebb) and James Donaldson from CSIRO and TropWATER at James Cook University.

Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation has recently completed a report Kaanju Fire Management 2003, funded by the Cape York Peninsula Development Association (CYPDA) Fire Project through Balkanu Cape York Development Corporation. The report investigates a number of issues including:

A ground-breaking partnership between Olkola Aboriginal Corporation, Pormpuraaw Aboriginal Shire Council and Natural Carbon, will see early season burning of over 13 000 square kilometres of Cape York savanna country using traditional burning practices.
Directors of Oyala Thumotang Land Trust met in Weipa on 6 and 7 May 2014 to plan for the future of the land trust.

By Lyndal Scobell

Predatory raids on turtle egg nests continue to threaten the survival of two endangered turtle species that nest on the shores of western Cape York Peninsula.

Feral pigs are the most common culprits.  Nearly 100% of Olive Ridley and Flatback turtle nests have suffered predation in recent years. Cape York Sustainable Futures (CYSF) hosted the Cape York Sea Turtle Project for the past six years, working  with Western Cape communities and ranger groups to reduce the impact of predators on the turtles eggs, increasing the chances of species survival.

Tree hollows are naturally-occurring holes in living or dead trees. Hollows form in many species but are most abundant in eucalypts. Termite activity, storms and fire contribute to both the formation and destruction of tree hollows.
Many species can live in moderately-altered landscapes that retain most of their trees, shrubs and grasses. However, a few species survive only where their habitat has been fenced to prevent grazing, trampling and rooting by feral or domestic animals.